Affording Obamacare

Isaac D. Buck Volume 71, Issue 2, 261-306 As it approaches its tenth birthday, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is devolving. Intended to solve problems that had vexed American health care for generations, the ACA built a comprehensive structure by providing more Americans with accessible health insurance, reordering the...

Playing Both Sides? Branded Sales, Generic Drugs, and Antitrust Policy

Michael A. Carrier, Mark A. Lemley, & Shawn Miller Volume 71, Issue 2, 307-358 The issue of high drug prices has recently exploded into public consciousness. And while many potential explanations have been offered, one has avoided scrutiny. Why has the growth in generic drugs not resulted in lower drug prices? In this Article, we explore a...

Constitutional End Games: Making Presidential Term Limits Stick

Rosalind Dixon & David Landau Volume 71, Issue 2, 359-418 Presidential term limits are an important and common protection of constitutional democracy around the world. But they are often evaded because they raise particularly difficult compliance problems that we call “end game” problems. Because presidents have overwhelming incentives to...

Unmasking the Right of Publicity

Dustin Marlan Volume 71, Issue 2, 419-474 In the landmark 1953 case of Haelan Laboratories v. Topps Chewing Gum, Judge Jerome Frank first articulated the modern right of publicity as a transferable intellectual property right. The right of publicity has since been seen to protect the strictly commercial value of one’s “persona”—the Latin-derived...

Net Neutrality: A State[d] Approach

Katherine Grainger Volume 71, Issue 2, 475-500 In 2018, the Federal Communications Commission ended federal net neutrality protections in its Restoring Internet Freedom Order. In response, many states introduced legislation to create their own state-level protections. States believe these protections are necessary, given the anticompetitive...

The Inadequacies of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2015 in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Bert Lathrop Volume 71, Issue 2, 501-534 The relentless accumulation of private consumer information through online services has dramatically expanded the attack surface available to cyber-criminals and belligerent state actors looking to either enrich themselves or disrupt digital service operations. In response to this growing threat and...

Do the “Haves” Come Out Ahead in Chinese Grassroots Courts? Rural Land Disputes Between Married-Out Women and Village Collectives

Peter C.H. Chan Volume 71, Issue 1, 1-78 This Article tests Galanter’s party capability theory in China’s grassroots courts by empirically examining 858 sampled judgments of rural land dispute lawsuits between marriedout women (the “have-nots,” or the less resourceful party) and village collectives (the “haves,” or the more resourceful party)...
HASTINGS LAW JOURNAL

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, HASTINGS COLLEGE OF THE LAW

About Hastings Law Journal

Since 1949, Hastings Law Journal has published scholarly articles, essays, and student Notes on a broad range of legal topics. With close to 100 members, HLJ publishes six issues each year reaching a large domestic and international audience. One of these issues may be dedicated to our periodic symposium, which features speeches, commentaries, and panel discussions on an area of current interest and development in the law.

UC Hastings’ flagship law review has contributed to the advancement of knowledge in legal thinking and case law through scholarly articles written by experts in the legal community. An occasional issue is devoted to a law symposium. Each Journal Volume publishes in December, February, April, May, June, and August.

Recent Topics

Recent topics have included: “Cybersecurity, Fake News & Policy: Dis- and Mis- Information,” “The Legal Dimension of 3D Printing,” “From Bench to Society: Law and Ethics at the Frontier of Genomic Technology,” and “Law & Policy of the Developing Brain: Neuroscience from Womb to Death.”

Recent Mentions by the Supreme Court of the United States

Recent Mentions by the Supreme Court of California

  • Williams & Fickett v. County of Fresno, 2 Cal.5th 1258 (2017), citing Kenneth A. Ehrman, Administrative Appeal and Judicial Review of Property Tax Assessments in California-The New Look, from Volume 22.
  • People v. Jackson, 1 Cal.5th 269 (2016), citing Andrew E. Taslitz, Does the Cold Nose Know? The Unscientific Myth of the Dog Scent Lineup, from Volume 42.

 

SCOCAblog

The Hastings Law Journal works jointly with Berkeley Law’s California Constitution Center to produce publications focused on substantive coverage of the Supreme Court of California.  We analyze cases and issues before the court, and report news about the court itself.  The contributors include former justices of the court, academics, and advocates experienced in appellate practice before the state high court.

View the most recent posts here.

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Topical Past Publications

http://www.hastingslawjournal.org/2014/08/17/guns-dont-kill-people-3d-printing-does-why-the-technology-is-a-distraction-from-effective-gun-controls/?preview_id=3542&preview_nonce=52d0c92f7b&post_format=quote&_thumbnail_id=-1&preview=true
PREVIOUS ISSUE

Affording Obamacare

Isaac D. Buck Volume 71, Issue 2, 261-306 As it approaches its tenth birthday, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is devolving. Intended to solve problems that had vexed American health care for generations, the ACA built a comprehensive structure by...

read more

Unmasking the Right of Publicity

Dustin Marlan Volume 71, Issue 2, 419-474 In the landmark 1953 case of Haelan Laboratories v. Topps Chewing Gum, Judge Jerome Frank first articulated the modern right of publicity as a transferable intellectual property right. The right of publicity has since been...

read more

Net Neutrality: A State[d] Approach

Katherine Grainger Volume 71, Issue 2, 475-500 In 2018, the Federal Communications Commission ended federal net neutrality protections in its Restoring Internet Freedom Order. In response, many states introduced legislation to create their own state-level protections....

read more

The Roper Extension: A California Perspective

Zoe Jordan Volume 71, Issue 1, 197-228 Although adulthood legally begins at age eighteen, young adults between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one are distinct from the rest of the adult population. Many studies conducted over the last two decades have revealed that...

read more