Volume 72

Electronic Form Over Substance: eSignature Laws Need Upgrades

Lothar Determann Volume 72, Issue 5, 1385-1452 Most professionals favor substance over form. Yet, with respect to form itself, more and more favor electronic form over substantive media and signatures. Companies, consumers, and governments increasingly use electronic...

Race and Equity in the Age of Unicorns

Lynnise E. Phillips Pantin Volume 72, Issue 5, 1453-1510 This Article critically examines startup culture and its legal predicates. The Article analyzes innovation culture as a whole and uses the downfall of Theranos to illustrate the deficiencies in Silicon Valley...

The DOJ’s Role in the Franchise No-Poach Problem

Molly Edgar Volume 72, Issue 5, 1573-1604 In 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a joint policy statement which notified human resource professionals of antitrust issues that may arise in the context of employee...

The Legal Value of Fiscal Sponsorship: A Proposal of New Law

Emma Geering Volume 72, Issue 5, 1605-1636 With social conscientiousness as a core value, American society has utilized nonprofit organizations to motivate social change. But as resources are finite and expertise in the complex legal, operational, and organizational...

Commercial Law Intersections

Giuliano G. Castellano & Andrea Tosato Volume 72, Issue 4, 999-1054 Commercial law is not a single, monolithic entity. It has grown into a dense thicket of subject-specific branches that govern a broad range of transactions and corporate actions. When one of such...

Damages for Noneconomic Harm in Intellectual Property Law

Thomas F. Cotter Volume 72, Issue 4, 1055-1120 This Article provides a comprehensive analysis of awards of “noneconomic” damages for reputational and emotional harm in intellectual property (IP) law, including trademarks, copyright and moral rights, the right of...

Not My Problem? Landlord Liability for Tenant-on-Tenant Harassment

Aric Short Volume 72, Issue 4, 1227-1274 Tenant-on-tenant harassment because of a victim’s race, gender, or other protected status, is a severe and increasingly widespread problem often targeting vulnerable tenants. The creation of a hostile housing environment...

All I Want for Christmas Is a Carbon Sink

Tori Timmons Volume 720, Issue 4, 1347-1384 Anthropogenic climate change is among the gravest problems humanity faces. Nonetheless, global greenhouse gas emissions are not slowing, and the complete elimination of greenhouse gas emissions is not currently foreseeable....

Health Care Civil Rights Under Medicare for All

Valarie K. Blake Volume 72, Issue 3, 773-826 The passage of Medicare for All would go a long way toward curing the inequality that plagues our health care system along racial, sex, age, health status, disability, and socioeconomic lines. Yet, while laudably creating a...

Contaminated Relationships in the Opioid Crisis

Elissa Philip Gentry & Benjamin J. McMichael Volume 72, Issue 3, 827-870 Unlike past public health crises, the opioid crisis arose from within the healthcare system itself. Entities within that system, particularly opioid manufacturers, may bear some liability in...

The Affordable Housing Crisis: Tiny Homes & Single-Family Zoning

Lauren Trambley Volume 72, Issue 3, 919-958 Although California was by no means an affordable state to reside in prior to 2008, Californians are still experiencing the reverberating effects of the collapse of the housing market in its present affordable housing...

Big Tech’s Buying Spree and the Failed Ideology of Competition Law

Mark Glick, Catherine Ruetschlin, & Darren Bush Volume 72, Issue 2, 465-516 Big Tech is on a buying spree. Companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon are gobbling up smaller companies at an unprecedented pace. But the law of competition isn’t ready for Big...

Nonmarket Criminal Justice Fees

Ariel Jurow Kleiman Volume 72, Issue 2, 517-564 The public finance literature tells us that user fees will introduce market-like efficiency to public good provision. Meanwhile, criminal justice scholars note that criminal justice fees have run amok, causing crippling...

Innovation and Own Prior Art

Amy R. Motomura Volume 72, Issue 2, 565-626 This Article analyzes a conflict between innovation and the patent system: innovation is a dynamic, iterative process, but a patent reflects only a single snapshot in time. Despite extensive scholarly and judicial discussion...

Reconsidering Dual Agency Conflicts in Residential Real Estate

Samuel Bayer Volume 72, Issue 2, 663-686 California has long permitted dual agency representation in residential real estate transactions, and consumers have long maligned the practice as presenting an unavoidable conflict of interest. However, dual agency provides...

The Unitary Executive Theory in Comparative Context

David M. Driesen Volume 72, Issue 1, 1-54 The debate over the unitary executive theory—the theory that the President should have sole control over the executive branch of government—has proven extremely parochial. Supporters of the theory argue that the original...

Corporate Technologies and the Tech Nirvana Fallacy

Luca Enriques & Dirk A. Zetzsche Volume 72, Issue 1, 55-98 This Article introduces the term Corporate Technologies (“CorpTech”) to refer to the use of distributed ledgers, smart contracts, Big Data analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning in the...

Unearthing the Origins of Quasi-Property Status

Alix Rogers Volume 72, Issue 1, 291-336 Under contemporary American law, human corpses and some bodily parts are classified as quasi-property. Quasi-property is an American legal conception composed of limited interests that mimic some of the functions of property,...