Volume 73

Untangling Right from Wrong in Insanity Law: Of Dogs, Wolves & God

Kate E. Bloch Volume 73, Issue 4, 947-974 In almost all U.S. jurisdictions, a qualifying mental illness that prevents an accused from distinguishing right from wrong can provide support for a determination of legal insanity. Nonetheless, “wrongfulness” remains a term...

Regulating Marginalized Labor

Mary Hoopes Volume 73, Issue 4, 1041-1098 Farmworkers are one of many vulnerable groups who exist largely in the shadows of the law. While there is a relatively robust regulatory framework that ostensibly governs the conditions under which they work, it is highly...

Mass Criminalization and Racial Disparities in Conviction Rates

Erin E. Meyers Volume 73, Issue 4, 1099-1144 A staggering number of Americans experience criminal justice contact each year, ranging from arrest to long-term incarceration. One 2014 Wall Street Journal report estimated that approximately one in three Americans are...

The Political Economy of Foreign Sovereign Immunity

Maryam Jamshidi Volume 73, Issue 3, 585-666 The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (“FSIA”) prohibits civil litigation against foreign states, their agencies, and instrumentalities unless one of several enumerated exceptions to immunity applies. The most important of...

Studying Nonobviousness

Jason Rantanen, Lindsay Kriz & Abigail A. Matthews Volume 73, Issue 3, 667-722 Many scholars have observed that an empirical study is only valid to the extent it is reliable. Yet assessments of the reliability of empirical legal studies are rare. The closest most...

Thirteenth Amendment Echoes in Fourteenth Amendment Doctrine

Christopher W. Schmidt Volume 73, Issue 3, 723-772 This Article argues that to better understand the historical development of Fourteenth Amendment antidiscrimination doctrine, we should look to the Thirteenth Amendment. The Fourteenth Amendment was drafted in...

Trade Secrecy and Innovation in Forensic Technology

Eli Siems, Katherine J. Strandburg & Nicholas Vincent Volume 73, Issue 3, 773-820 Trade secrecy is a major barrier to public scrutiny of probabilistic software tools that are increasingly used at all stages of the criminal system, from policing and investigation...

Identifying and Countering Fake News

Mark Verstraete, Jane R. Bambauer & Derek E. Bambauer Volume 73, Issue 3, 821-860 Fake news presents a complex regulatory challenge in the increasingly democratized and intermediated on-line information ecosystem. Inaccurate information is readily created by...

When Hospitals Sue Patients

Isaac D. Buck Volume 73, Issue 2, 191-232 “The biggest crime you can commit in America is being sick.” Grimly demonstrated by the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals serve as the central hub of American health care. Increasingly exercising market power, setting clinical...

Weaponizing Culture to Undermine International Women’s Rights

Lan Cao Volume 73, Issue 2, 233-300 The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (“UDHR”) remains an emblem of hope and change in a world filled with continuing human rights violations. Its promise, enshrined in 1948, is as relevant then as it is now—that the...

The Psychology of Secret Settlements

Gilat Juli Bachar Volume 73, Issue 1, 1-48 The #MeToo movement called attention to the use of non-disclosure clauses in settlement agreements as a tool to silence victims of sexual wrongdoing by repeat offenders such as movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and Olympic gymnast...

The Federal Response to COVID-19: Lessons from the Pandemic

Nancy J. Knauer Volume 73, Issue 1, 49-104 When the first suspected human-to-human transmission of the novel coronavirus was reported in January 2020, the United States had in place an elaborate set of pandemic disaster and response plans that spanned hundreds of...